Australia and Mishal Pakistan are building the capacity of media to raise awareness of malnutrition

The Australian Government is supporting Mishal Pakistan to deliver a series of workshops across Pakistan to build the capacity of more than 100 journalists to report on Pakistan’s nutrition crisis.

Acting Australian High Commissioner, Jurek Juszczyk, who attended the closing ceremony of the Islamabad workshop today, said the role of media in creating awareness of malnutrition in Pakistan was critical.

“The media can advocate for concrete measures and create a clear vision for Pakistan free from malnutrition,” Mr Juszczyk said.

Pakistan is facing a malnutrition crisis with 44 per cent of the population stunted.  In economic terms, malnutrition costs Pakistan more than three per cent of its GDP annually, which equates to USD7.6 billion.

The Eliminating Hidden Hunger workshops are designed to better equip media professionals and journalists to report on Pakistan’s malnutrition crisis.  Workshops have already been held in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Balochistan, Punjab and Sindh.  In addition to journalists, more than 60 parliamentarians and members of the federal and provincial standing committees on Food Security, Health and Agriculture have attended the workshops.

A senior journalist from Islamabad, Mubarik Zeb Khan who attended the workshop said: “Through this initiative, media will be empowered to generate knowledge-based reporting on health-economics issues which will result in awareness among public spheres and increase accountability of policy-makers.”

Nida Karim, Program Specialist Eliminating Hidden Hunger at Mishal said: “Today’s workshop focused on strengthening the delivery platforms for a better and fact-based coverage of malnutrition statistics in the media in Pakistan.”

Australia is a lead donor in improving nutrition outcomes in Pakistan and is investing AUD39 million in the World Bank’s Multi Donor Trust Fund for Nutrition which supports the Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Governments to scale-up and sustain an effective response to malnutrition.

In December last year, the Australian Government partnered with Mishal for the 2016 AGAHI Awards for Journalists, which recognise the efforts of journalists in reporting on social, economic and development issues and celebrates the role of media as a vehicle to influence policy and decision-making.  It was the first year the AGAHI Awards included an award category on ‘Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Malnutrition’.

Pakistan has the 3rd highest percentage of stunted children in the world

Sindh has 49.8% stunting rate amongst all the provinces

31 July 2017 – Karachi,PK – Media needs to become part of the development agenda in Pakistan, to ensure transparency and accountability for quality service delivery to the citizens, this was concluded at the session on Smart Policy Making on Eliminating Hidden Hunger, today in Karachi. The session was attended by senior journalists, field reporters, media and development professionals, representatives of civil society and academia.

Mishal Pakistan, the Country Partner Institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum with support from the Australian High Commission, Islamabad held a special session for the journalists working on health public policy.

The data from Mishal’s research shows that the total number of households below the nutritious diet thresholds in Sindh 70.8%, Punjab 65.5%, while the numbers for Khyber Pakhtunkhwa are67.4%, and 83.4% for Balochistan.

MubashirZaidi, senior journalist and anchor person Dawn News said, “Mishal Pakistan has launched the Smart Policy Making initiative to ensure the accountability of policy makers through media. The journalists need such session to understand the issues lying on the surface and to grasp better understanding as to how to report that to the public. Today, fact based reporting should be done to fill the required knowledge gap in the public and political spheres.”

He further said that “The awareness of nutrient deficiency level of Iron and Iodine in Pakistan remains highest especially in the urban community with up-to 42.0% and 61.6% respectively. Women and children remain the ultimate victims of these deficiencies resulting in high mortality rates”.

 

NidaKarim, Program Specialist Eliminating Hidden Hungerat Mishal Pakistan, while briefing the members of the journalists’ community said, “The Smart Policy Making initiative of Mishal is to bring media at the core of the development agenda in Pakistan, the initiative will ensure policy making through data and real time feedback. This will alsomakepolicy makers accountable to the people. This would not only help the parliamentarians to improve service delivery to the citizens but would also contribute in improving Pakistan’s competitiveness on global footing, while creating accountability through media. She said, although the costs for Nutrition per capita of PKR 2,061/per month is lowest in Punjab as compared to Sindh PKR 2,306, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa PKR 2,152 and Balochistan at PKR 2,415.The amount is still out of reach of average citizens’ buying power.

Nida Karim further said, “Mishal Pakistan along with the Australian High Commission is engaging policy makers and journalists across Pakistan to understand the dynamics of malnutrition in the country. Today’s session with the journalists focused on strengthening the delivery platforms for a better andfact-based coverage of malnutrition stats inPunjab.”

NadeemRaza Senior journalist said this is an important initiative, where media can revive public’s trust in institutions, however this requires professionalism and dedication to report on facts. The journalists will lead this change by ensuring accountability of the relevant policy makers to ensure Pakistan’s commitment to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal 2 – Eliminating Hunger. He also emphasized the need for research and hard work for young journalists to progress in journalism as a career.

Dr.ShabbirHussain, Associate Professor of Mass Communication Department, International Islamic University Islamabad during his presentation briefed that almost 24% of the population in Pakistan is suffering with Hidden Hunger, while stunting and malnutrition are immediate challenges faced by the society, media is unable to create a public debate on this. The awareness of nutrient deficiency level of Iron and Iodine in Pakistan remains highest especially in the urban community with upto 42.0% and 61.6% respectively. Women and children remain the ultimate victims of these deficiencies resulting in high mortality rates.

Earlier sessions have been held with journalists from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Balochistan and Punjab on Smart Policy Making. Similarly, the parliamentarians from Sindh, Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa have also been briefed on the smart policymaking process. The parliamentarians from Punjab will be briefed on the state of Hidden Hunger later this month.

The initiative Eliminating Hidden Hunger has been launched by Mishal Pakistan, the initiative has is aimed to improve the narrative building on Nutrition by engaging various stakeholders including press clubs, journalist associations, policy making institutes and academia across Pakistan.

Through the initiative “Eliminating Hidden Hunger”, Mishal will build the capacity of more than 120 journalists and editors, while also engaging more than 60 parliamentarians and members of the federal and provincial standing committees on Food Security, Health and Agriculture etc. The initiative is supported by various development agencies and private sector organizations. The initiative is creating a master class of key opinion leaders in the country on nutrition and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) goal 2.

An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals. “Hidden hunger” is how health experts often refer to micronutrient deficiencies because most people affected do not show the visible physical symptoms and hence may not be aware of their condition. Hidden Hunger’s effects can be devastating, leading to mental impairment, poor health, low productivity, and even death. Its adverse effects on child health and survival are particularly acute, especially within the first 1,000 days of a child’s life, from conception to the age of two, resulting in serious physical and cognitive consequences.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Australia is a lead donor in improving nutrition outcomes in Pakistan. As founding donor, Australia has committed AUD 39 million to the World Bank’s Multi Donor Trust Fund for Nutrition which supports the Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Governments to scale-up and sustain an effective response to malnutrition. On a policy level Australian Government supports the National and Provincial Fortification Alliances for improved legislation, coordination and advocacy for fortifying foods with essential vitamins and minerals to reduce high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in the population. Australia is also supporting robust evidence generation on malnutrition through its innovative grants scheme, implemented through the Scaling Up Nutrition Academia and Research Network of Pakistan.

Please visit Pakistan’s first infographic on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger” information and data at: http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/

Journalists to Improve the State of Reporting on Eliminating Hidden Hunger.Making Media, Citizens’ Vigilance Tool for Accountability on Policymakers.

24% Population in the country is suffering from Hidden Hunger. Mishal Pakistan and Australia Award Held Session with Journalists on Smart Policy making on Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Nutrition. The Initiative will make policy makers accountable through media vigilance on SDG2 Eliminating Hunger.

Mishal Pakistan and the Quetta Press Club to encourage indepth reporting on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Challenges”by discussing the current state of health in Balochistan – Syed Ali Shah, Bureau Chief Dawn.

19 July 2017,QuettaPK – Media needs to become part of the development agenda in Pakistan, to ensure transparency and accountability for quality service delivery to the citizens, this was concluded at the session on Smart Policy Making on Eliminating Hidden Hunger, today at the Quetta Press Club. The session was attended by senior journalists, field reporters, media and development professionals, representatives of civil society and academia. 

Mishal Pakistan, the Country Partner Institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum with support from the Australian High Commission, Islamabad held a special session for the journalists working on health public policy. The session was designed in collaboration with the Quetta Press Club to encourage journalists and media professionals to understandthe concept of smart policy making on eliminating hidden hunger and nutrition awareness.

SaleemShahid, Senior Bureau Chief Dawn while presenting his views in the session said “The malnutrition issue exists. Our journalists really need such workshops to understand and know how to do it. We need to engage the journalists as well as the editors to motivate them to talk about the health issues. Today, instead of views and opinion fact based reporting should be done to fill the required knowledge gap in the public and political spheres.”

The data from Mishal’s research shows that the total number of households below the nutritious diet thresholds in Punjab are 65.5%, while the numbers for Khyber Pakhtunkhwaare 67.4%, Sindh 70.8%, and 83.4% for Balochistan.

Member of the Quetta Press Club Governing Body and Bureau Chief Dawn,Syed Ali Shah, said through this initiative, media will be empowered to generate knowledge based reporting on health issues which will result in to awareness among public spheres while holding responsible policy makers accountable. The Quetta Press Club will be at the forefront of this initiative by ensuringPakistan’s commitment to achievethe Sustainable Development Goal 2 – Eliminating Hunger.“However, it is not possible without utilizing available data and commitment to professionalism”, he further added.

NidaKarim, Program Specialist Eliminating Hidden Hungerat Mishal Pakistan, while briefing the members of the journalists’ community said, “The Smart Policy Making initiative of Mishal is to bring media at the core of the development agenda in Pakistan, the initiative will ensure policy making through data and real time feedback. This will alsomakepolicy makers accountable to the people. This would not only help the parliamentarians to improve service delivery to the citizens but would also contribute in improving Pakistan’s competitiveness on global footing, while creating accountability through media. She said, although the costs for Nutrition per capita of PKR 2,061/per month is lowest in Punjab as compared to Sindh PKR 2,306, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa PKR 2,152 and Balochistan at PKR 2,415.The amount is still out of reach of average citizens’ buying power.

NidaKarim further said, “Mishal Pakistan along with the Australian High Commission is engaging policy makers and journalists across Pakistan to understand the dynamics of malnutrition in the country. Today’s session with the journalists focused on strengthening the delivery platforms for a better andfact-based coverage of malnutrition stats inPunjab.”

Almost 24% of the population in Pakistan is suffering with Hidden Hunger, while stunting and malnutrition are immediate challenges faced by the society, media is unable to create a public debate on this. The awareness of nutrient deficiency level of Iron and Iodine in Pakistan remains highest especially in the urban community with upto 42.0% and 61.6% respectively. Women and children remain the ultimate victims of these deficiencies resulting in high mortality rates. 

Earlier session has been held with journalists from Khyber Pakhtunkhwaand Punjab on Smart Policy Making. Similarly, the parliamentarians from Sindh and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa have also been briefed on the smart policymaking process. The parliamentarians from Punjab will be briefed on the state of Hidden Hunger later this month.

The initiative Eliminating Hidden Hunger has been launched byMishalPakistan, the initiative has is aimed to improve the narrative building on Nutrition by engaging various stakeholders including press clubs, journalist associations, policy making institutes and academia across Pakistan.

Through the initiative “Eliminating Hidden Hunger”, Mishal will build the capacity of more than 120 journalists and editors, while also engaging more than 60 parliamentarians and members of the federal and provincial standing committees on Food Security, Health and Agriculture etc. The initiative is supported by various development agencies and private sector organizations. The initiative is creating a master class of key opinion leaders in the country on nutrition and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) goal 2. 

An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals. “Hidden hunger” is how health experts often refer to micronutrient deficiencies because most people affected do not show the visible physical symptoms and hence may not be aware of their condition. Hidden Hunger’s effects can be devastating, leading to mental impairment, poor health, low productivity, and even death. Its adverse effects on child health and survival are particularly acute, especially within the first 1,000 days of a child’s life, from conception to the age of two, resulting in serious physical and cognitive consequences.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Australia is a lead donor in improving nutrition outcomes in Pakistan. As founding donor, Australia has committed AUD 39 million to the World Bank’s Multi Donor Trust Fund for Nutrition which supports the Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Governments to scale-up and sustain an effective response to malnutrition. On a policy level Australian Government supports the National and Provincial Fortification Alliances for improved legislation, coordination and advocacy for fortifying foods with essential vitamins and minerals to reduce high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in the population. Australia is also supporting robust evidence generation on malnutrition through its innovative grants scheme, implemented through the Scaling Up Nutrition Academia and Research Network of Pakistan.

Please visit Pakistan’s first infographic on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger” information and data at: http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/

Parliamentarians to Eliminate Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Challenges in Balochistan

The key focus is to capacitate policy makers for a more harmonized mechanism to ensure service delivery to the citizens. The initiative would also facilitate the knowledge flow among key stakeholders to “Eliminate Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Challenges”.

20 July 2017 – Quetta, PK – Mishal Pakistan, the Country Partner Institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum in collaboration with the Standing Committee on Health held a special session to capacitate the Parliamentarians for smart policy making on eliminating hidden hunger and nutrition awareness. The session was held at the Provincial Assembly and attended by the Speaker Balochistan Assembly, Former Health Minister Balochistan, Chairman and members of the Standing Committee on health, members of academician and senior journalists.

During her concluding remarks, Ms. Rahila Hameed Khan Durrani, Speaker Balochistan Assembly said “We need to engage institutions, academia and bureaucrats to make it part of the legislation for sustainable development”. She further added “This was a much needed session initiated by Mishal Pakistan and Australia Awards. It is our responsibility to think on these scales and we thank Mishal Pakistan as a partner for their support.”

Nida Karim, Project Manager Eliminating Hidden Hunger, while briefing the members of Balochistan parliament said, “We have launched the Smart Policy Making initiative to ensure policy making through data and real time feedback through media. This would not only help the parliamentarians to improve service delivery to the citizens but would also contribute in improving Pakistan’s competitiveness on global footing, while creating accountability through media.”

The adult literacy rate in Baluchistan is 43.6% whereas the young literacy rate lies at 55.9%.The awareness of nutrient deficiency level of Iron and Iodine in Pakistan remains highest especially in the urban community with upto 42.0% and 61.6% respectively. Women and children remain the ultimate victims of these deficiencies resulting in high mortality rates

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian High Commission (Australian Aid) has reached out to Mishal to partner and launch a nationwide program to create knowledge resources on Nutrition challenges in Pakistan. The program will address the “Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), Goal No. 2 ‘Zero Hunger’”.

The initiative by Mishal has launched the program to improve the narrative building on Nutrition by engaging various stakeholders including press clubs, journalism associations, policy making institutes and academia across Pakistan.

This collaboration has come into two different phases i.e. Initially in the shape of support for AGAHI Awards, where the Australian Aid is supporting the Journalism Awards in the categories of Eliminating Hidden Hunger, Agriculture and the Food, Water and Energy Security Nexus.”

The second phase of the collaboration between the Australian Aid and Mishal is to build the capacity of journalists and field reporters to create a better understanding on nutrition related challenges, while at the same time it will capacitate the parliamentarians and policy makers to debate suggest and approve Nutrition focused policies for a productive workforce of the future. The initiative is working across Pakistan with focal areas in

provincial and federal capitals in Sindh, Punjab, Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, AJK and the Federal Capital, Islamabad.

Through this initiative “Eliminating Hidden Hunger”, Mishal will build the capacity of more than 120 journalists and editors, while also engaging more than 60 parliamentarians and members of the federal and provincial standing committees on Food Security, Health and Agriculture etc. The initiative is supported by various development agencies and private sector organizations. The initiative is creating a master class of key opinion leaders in the country on nutrition and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) goal 2.

An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals. “Hidden hunger” is how health experts often refer to micronutrient deficiencies because most people affected do not show the visible physical symptoms and hence may not be aware of their condition. Hidden Hunger’s effects can be devastating, leading to mental impairment, poor health, low productivity, and even death. Its adverse effects on child health and survival are particularly acute, especially within the first 1,000 days of a child’s life, from conception to the age of two, resulting in serious physical and cognitive consequences.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Australia is a lead donor in improving nutrition outcomes in Pakistan. As founding donor, Australia has committed AUD 39 million to the World Bank’s Multi Donor Trust Fund for Nutrition which supports the Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Governments to scale-up and sustain an effective response to malnutrition. On a policy level Australian Government supports the National and Provincial Fortification Alliances for improved legislation, coordination and advocacy for fortifying foods with essential vitamins and minerals to reduce high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in the population. Australia is also supporting robust evidence generation on malnutrition through its innovative grants scheme, implemented through the Scaling Up Nutrition Academia and Research Network of Pakistan.

Please visit Pakistan’s first infographic on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger” information and data at: http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/

Journalists Vow to Work on Eliminating Hidden Hunger. Making Media, Citizens’ Vigilance Tool for Accountability on Policymakers

24% Population in the country is suffering from Hidden Hunger. Mishal Pakistan and Australia Award Held Session with Journalists on Smart Policymaking on Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Nutrition. The Initiative will make policy makers accountable through media vigilance on SDG2 Eliminating Hunger.

Joint initiative of Mishal and the Lahore Press Club would facilitate the knowledge flow among key stakeholders to “Eliminate Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Challenges” – Sheraz Hasnat, Senior Journalist.

11 July 2017, Lahore PK – Media needs to become part of the development agenda in Pakistan, to ensure transparency and accountability for quality service delivery to the citizens, this was concluded at the session on Smart Policy Making on Eliminating Hidden Hunger, today at the Lahore Press Club. The session was attended by senior journalists, field reporters, media and development professionals, representatives of civil society and academia.

Mishal Pakistan, the Country Partner Institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum with support from the Australian High Commission, Islamabad held a special session for the journalists working on health public policy. The session was designed in collaboration with the Lahore Press Club to encourage journalists and media professionals to understand the concept of smart policy making on eliminating hidden hunger and nutrition awareness.

The data from Mishal’s research shows that the total number of households below the nutritious diet thresholds in Punjab are 65.5%, while the numbers for Khyber Pakhtunkhwa are 67.4%, Sindh 70.8%, and 83.4% for Balochistan.

Member of the Lahore Press Club Governing Body and Senior Correspondent DawnNews, Sheraz Hasnat, said this is an important initiative, where media can revive public’s trust in institutions, however this requires professionalism and dedication to report on facts. The Lahore Press Club will lead this change by ensuring accountability of the relevant policy makers to ensure Pakistan’s commitment to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal 2 – Eliminating Hunger. He also emphasized the need for research and hard work for young journalists to progress in journalism as a career.

Nida Karim, Program Specialist Eliminating Hidden Hunger at Mishal Pakistan, while briefing the members of the journalists’ community said, “The Smart Policy Making initiative of Mishal is to bring media at the core of the development agenda in Pakistan, the initiative will ensure policy making through data and real time feedback. This will also make policy makers accountable to the people. This would not only help the parliamentarians to improve service delivery to the citizens but would also contribute in improving Pakistan’s competitiveness on global footing, while creating accountability through media. She said, although the costs for Nutrition per capita of PKR 2,061/per month is lowest in Punjab as compared to Sindh PKR 2,306, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa PKR 2,152 and Balochistan at PKR 2,415. The amount is still out of reach of average citizens’ buying power.

Nida Karim further said, “Mishal Pakistan along with the Australian High Commission is engaging policy makers and journalists across Pakistan to understand the dynamics of malnutrition in the country. Today’s session with the journalists focused on strengthening the delivery platforms for a better and fact-based coverage of malnutrition stats in Punjab.”

Prof. Zafar Iqbal, Chairman Department of Mass Communications, International Islamic University Islamabad and Shabir Wahgra during their presentations briefed that almost 24% of the population in Pakistan is suffering with Hidden Hunger, while stunting and malnutrition are immediate challenges faced by the society, media is unable to create a public debate on this. The awareness of nutrient deficiency level of Iron and Iodine in Pakistan remains highest especially in the urban community with upto 42.0% and 61.6% respectively. Women and children remain the ultimate victims of these deficiencies resulting in high mortality rates.

Earlier session has been held with journalists from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa on Smart Policy Making at the Peshawar Press Club. Similarly, the parliamentarians from Sindh and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa have also been briefed on the smart policymaking process. The parliamentarians from Punjab will be briefed on the state of Hidden Hunger later this month.

The initiative Eliminating Hidden Hunger has been launched by Mishal Pakistan, the initiative has is aimed to improve the narrative building on Nutrition by engaging various stakeholders including press clubs, journalist associations, policy making institutes and academia across Pakistan.

Through the initiative “Eliminating Hidden Hunger”, Mishal will build the capacity of more than 120 journalists and editors, while also engaging more than 60 parliamentarians and members of the federal and provincial standing committees on Food Security, Health and Agriculture etc. The initiative is supported by various development agencies and private sector organizations. The initiative is creating a master class of key opinion leaders in the country on nutrition and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) goal 2.

An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals. “Hidden hunger” is how health experts often refer to micronutrient deficiencies because most people affected do not show the visible physical symptoms and hence may not be aware of their condition. Hidden Hunger’s effects can be devastating, leading to mental impairment, poor health, low productivity, and even death. Its adverse effects on child health and survival are particularly acute, especially within the first 1,000 days of a child’s life, from conception to the age of two, resulting in serious physical and cognitive consequences.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Australia is a lead donor in improving nutrition outcomes in Pakistan. As founding donor, Australia has committed AUD 39 million to the World Bank’s Multi Donor Trust Fund for Nutrition which supports the Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Governments to scale-up and sustain an effective response to malnutrition. On a policy level Australian Government supports the National and Provincial Fortification Alliances for improved legislation, coordination and advocacy for fortifying foods with essential vitamins and minerals to reduce high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in the population. Australia is also supporting robust evidence generation on malnutrition through its innovative grants scheme, implemented through the Scaling Up Nutrition Academia and Research Network of Pakistan.

Please visit Pakistan’s first infographic on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger” information and data at: http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/

Australia Awards Supports Media Development Initiative on Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Nutrition

Mishal Pakistan and Australia Award Held Session with Journalists on Smart Policy Making on Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Nutrition. The Initiative will make policy makers accountable through media vigilance.

The initiative would also facilitate the knowledge flow among key stakeholders to “Eliminate Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Challenges” – Saif ul Islam Saifi, President Khyber Union of Journalist

06 July 2017 – Peshawar, PK – Media needs to become part of the development agenda in Pakistan, to ensure transparency and accountability for quality service delivery to the citizens, this was concluded at the session on Smart Policy Making on Eliminating Hidden Hunger, today at the Peshawar Press Club. The session was attended by senior journalists, field reporters, media and development professionals, representatives of civil society and academia. 

Mishal Pakistan, the Country Partner Institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum with support from the Australian High Commission, Islamabad held a special session for the journalists working on health public policy. The session was designed to encourage journalists and media professionals to understandthe concept of smart policy making on eliminating hidden hunger and nutrition awareness.

Senior Journalist and President, Khyber Union of Journalist, Saif ul Islam Saifi, said this is an important initiative, where media can revive public’s trust in institutions, however this requires professionalism and dedication to report on facts. He emphasized the need for research and hard work for young journalists to progress in journalism as a career. 

Amir Jahangir, Chief Executive Officer of Mishal Pakistan, while briefing the members of the journalists’ community said, “The Smart Policy Making initiative is to bring media at the core of the development agenda in Pakistan, the initiative will ensure policy making through data and real time feedback. This will alsomakepolicy makers accountable to the people. This would not only help the parliamentarians to improve service delivery to the citizens but would also contribute in improving Pakistan’s competitiveness on global footing, while creating accountability through media.

Dr. Ejaz Habib, Nutrition Focal Point of the World Food Program made a presentation and briefed the participants about the current situation of Hidden Hunger in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. He said, the per capita monthly cost of nutritious diet varies throughout Pakistan, it is at Rs. 2,061 in Punjab, Sindh 2,306, Balochistan 2,415, while it lies at Rs. 2,152 in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, still it remains out of the reach of an ordinary citizen. He said, media can play a crucial role in raising the awareness among the communities and various stakeholdersrelevant to this important issue for Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

Prof. Zafar Iqbal, Chairman Department of Mass Communications, International Islamic University Islamabad and Shabir Wahgra during their presentations briefed that almost 24% of the population in Pakistan is suffering with Hidden Hunger, while stunting and malnutrition are immediate challenges faced by the society, media is unable to create a public debate on this. The awareness of nutrient deficiency level of Iron and Iodine in Pakistan remains highest especially in the urban community with upto 42.0% and 61.6% respectively. Women and children remain the ultimate victims of these deficiencies resulting in high mortality rates. 

Earlier a session was held with the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Parliamentarians on Smart Policy Making at the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Provincial Assembly. The key focus for the session was to capacitate policy makers for a more harmonized mechanism to ensure service delivery to the citizens. The initiative would also facilitate the knowledge flow among key stakeholders to “Eliminate Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Challenges”.

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian High Commission (Australian Aid) has reached out to Mishal to partner and launch a nationwide program to create knowledge resources on Nutrition challenges in Pakistan. The program will address the “Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), Goal No. 2 ‘Zero Hunger’”.

The initiative by Mishal has launched the program to improve the narrative building on Nutrition by engaging various stakeholders including press clubs, journalism associations, policy making institutes and academia across Pakistan.

This collaboration has come into two different phases i.e. Initially in the shape of support for AGAHI Awards, where the Australian Aid is supporting the Journalism Awards in the categories of Eliminating Hidden Hunger, Agriculture and the Food, Water and Energy Security Nexus.”

The second phase of the collaboration between the Australian Aid and Mishal is to build the capacity of journalists and field reporters to create a better understanding on nutrition related challenges, while at the same time it will capacitate the parliamentarians and policy makers to debate suggest and approve Nutrition focused policies for a productive workforce of the future. The initiative is working across Pakistan with focal areas in provincial and federal capitals in Sindh, Punjab, Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, AJK and the Federal Capital, Islamabad.

Through this initiative “Eliminating Hidden Hunger”, Mishal will build the capacity of more than 120 journalists and editors, while also engaging more than 60 parliamentarians and members of the federal and provincial standing committees on Food Security, Health and Agriculture etc. The initiative is supported by various development agencies and private sector organizations. The initiative is creating a master class of key opinion leaders in the country on nutrition and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) goal 2. 

An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals. “Hidden hunger” is how health experts often refer to micronutrient deficiencies because most people affected do not show the visible physical symptoms and hence may not be aware of their condition. Hidden Hunger’s effects can be devastating, leading to mental impairment, poor health, low productivity, and even death. Its adverse effects on child health and survival are particularly acute, especially within the first 1,000 days of a child’s life, from conception to the age of two, resulting in serious physical and cognitive consequences.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Australia is a lead donor in improving nutrition outcomes in Pakistan. As founding donor, Australia has committed AUD 39 million to the World Bank’s Multi Donor Trust Fund for Nutrition which supports the Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Governments to scale-up and sustain an effective response to malnutrition. On a policy level Australian Government supports the National and Provincial Fortification Alliances for improved legislation, coordination and advocacy for fortifying foods with essential vitamins and minerals to reduce high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in the population. Australia is also supporting robust evidence generation on malnutrition through its innovative grants scheme, implemented through the Scaling Up Nutrition Academia and Research Network of Pakistan.

Please visit Pakistan’s first infographic on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger” information and data at: http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Parliamentarians to Adopt Smart Policy Making on Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Awareness – Dr. Meher Taj Rohghani, Deputy Speaker Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Assembly

The key focus is to capacitate policy makers for a more harmonized mechanism to ensure service delivery to the citizens. The initiative would also facilitate the knowledge flow among key stakeholders to “Eliminate Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Challenges”.

05 July 2017 –PK – Mishal Pakistan, the Country Partner Institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum in collaboration with the Standing Committee on Primary and Secondary Health held a special session to capacitate the Parliamentarians for smart policy making on eliminating hidden hunger and nutrition awareness. The session was held at the Provincial Assembly and attended by the Standing Committee members on health, members of academician and senior journalists.

Dr. Meher Taj Rohghani, Deputy Speaker of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Assembly while addressing the session said, “Being a doctor and nutritionist I urge my parliamentarians to give special attention to Hidden Hunger, as more than 24% of the population in Pakistan is suffering from this. We need to create smart legislation on food fortification. She further emphasized the importance to discourage carcinogenetic materials. She further said that health professionals should be briefed on Nutrition and Hidden Hunger related issues as well. 

Mehmood Jan, Chairman Standing Committee on health of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa said, “Khyber Pakhtunkhwa is committed to resolve the malnutrition issues in the province. Media can play a very important role in bringing development centred debate and nutrition related information to public spheres”. “The malnutrition and hidden hunger challenges need to be addressed in order to improve current state of health and safeguard the future of our children”, he further added.

Amir Jahangir, Chief Executive Officer of Mishal Pakistan, while briefing the members of KP parliament said, “We have launched the Smart Policy Making initiative to ensure policy making through data and real time feedback through media. This would not only help the parliamentarians to improve service delivery to the citizens but would also contribute in improving Pakistan’s competitiveness on global footing, while creating accountability through media.

The adult literacy rate in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa is 49.0% whereas the young literacy rate lies at 67.2%.The awareness of nutrient deficiency level of Iron and Iodine in Pakistan remains highest especially in the urban community with upto 42.0% and 61.6% respectively. Women and children remain the ultimate victims of these deficiencies resulting in high mortality rates.

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian High Commission (Australian Aid) has reached out to Mishal to partner and launch a nationwide program to create knowledge resources on Nutrition challenges in Pakistan. The program will address the “Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), Goal No. 2 ‘Zero Hunger’”.

The initiative by Mishal has launched the program to improve the narrative building on Nutrition by engaging various stakeholders including press clubs, journalism associations, policy making institutes and academia across Pakistan.

This collaboration has come into two different phases i.e. Initially in the shape of support for AGAHI Awards, where the Australian Aid is supporting the Journalism Awards in the categories of Eliminating Hidden Hunger, Agriculture and the Food, Water and Energy Security Nexus.”

The second phase of the collaboration between the Australian Aid and Mishal is to build the capacity of journalists and field reporters to create a better understanding on nutrition related challenges, while at the same time it will capacitate the parliamentarians and policy makers to debate suggest and approve Nutrition focused policies for a productive workforce of the future. The initiative is working across Pakistan with focal areas in provincial and federal capitals in Sindh, Punjab, Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, AJK and the Federal Capital, Islamabad.

Through this initiative “Eliminating Hidden Hunger”, Mishal will build the capacity of more than 120 journalists and editors, while also engaging more than 60 parliamentarians and members of the federal and provincial standing committees on Food Security, Health and Agriculture etc. The initiative is supported by various development agencies and private sector organizations. The initiative is creating a master class of key opinion leaders in the country on nutrition and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) goal 2.

An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals. “Hidden hunger” is how health experts often refer to micronutrient deficiencies because most people affected do not show the visible physical symptoms and hence may not be aware of their condition. Hidden Hunger’s effects can be devastating, leading to mental impairment, poor health, low productivity, and even death. Its adverse effects on child health and survival are particularly acute, especially within the first 1,000 days of a child’s life, from conception to the age of two, resulting in serious physical and cognitive consequences.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Australia is a lead donor in improving nutrition outcomes in Pakistan. As founding donor, Australia has committed AUD 39 million to the World Bank’s Multi Donor Trust Fund for Nutrition which supports the Balochistan and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Governments to scale-up and sustain an effective response to malnutrition. On a policy level Australian Government supports the National and Provincial Fortification Alliances for improved legislation, coordination and advocacy for fortifying foods with essential vitamins and minerals to reduce high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in the population. Australia is also supporting robust evidence generation on malnutrition through its innovative grants scheme, implemented through the Scaling Up Nutrition Academia and Research Network of Pakistan.

Please visit Pakistan’s first infographic on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger” information and data at: http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/

Sindh Parliamentarians to Work with Mishal Pakistan for Smart Policy Making on Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Awareness.

The key focus is to capacitate policy makers for a more harmonized mechanism to ensure service delivery to the citizens. The initiative would also facilitate the knowledge flow among key stakeholders to “Eliminate Hidden Hunger and Nutrition Challenges” in Sindh.

19 May 2017 – Karachi, PK – Mishal Pakistan, the Country Partner Institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum in collaboration with the Standing Committee on Primary and Secondary Health held a special session to capacitate the Sindh Parliamentarians for smart policy making on eliminating hidden hunger and nutrition awareness. The session was held at the Sindh Assembly and attended by the committee members, representatives from the World Food Program, UNICEF, members of academician and senior journalists.

Dr. Sohrab Khan Sarki, Chairman Standing Committee on Primary and Secondary Health Sindh, during his remarks said “Adequate food and nutrition is every citizen’s right. Given Sindh’s Health statistics, mainly children and women suffer from malnutrition which in severe cases has resulted in deaths as well. He further added “Sindh’s provincial government has already taken an initiative for the Protection and Promotion of Breastfeeding and Child Nutrition Act; however, Mishal Pakistan along with Australian High Commission has started a much-needed dialogue on nutrition and eliminating hidden hunger at provincial and district levels”.

Mr. Sikandar Ali Mandhro, Minister for Health, Government of Sindh said, “we welcome the intervention by Mishal to work with Government of Sindh, the key focus of this initiative should be to capacitate policy makers and the parliamentarians, so a more harmonized debate and policy making can be ensured for service delivery to the citizens. The initiative would also facilitate the knowledge flow among key stakeholders to “Eliminate Hidden Hunger”.

Amir Jahangir, Chief Executive Officer of Mishal Pakistan, while briefing the members of Sindh parliament said, “We have launched the Smart Policy Making initiative to ensure policy making through data and real time feedback through media. This would not only help the parliamentarians to improve service delivery to the citizens but would also contribute in improving Pakistan’s competitiveness on global footing, while creating accountability through media.

Rabia Dadabhoy, Director Dadabhoy Institute of Higher Education in her message said that, “through this initiative, we are jointly generating new insights on Sindh to ensure efforts in the fight against hidden hunger and nutrition challenges”.

Dr. Zafar Iqbal, Chairman Department of Mass Communication, International Islamic University, Islamabad while presenting the case for nutrition and health communication said, “Pakistan has an alarmingly high level of malnutrition; 24 percent of the population in Pakistan is undernourished. The most recent estimates by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) state that 37.5 million people in Pakistan are not receiving proper nourishment. The issue is complex and widespread, with deficiencies ranging from protein to iodine, along with other health problems due to insufficient intake of these essential nutrients, we must generate public debate around this on war footings through media interventions and legislative measures”.

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian High Commission (Australian Aid) has reached out to Mishal to partner and launch a nationwide program to create knowledge resources on Nutrition challenges in Pakistan. The program will address the “Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), Goal No. 2 ‘Zero Hunger’”.

The initiative by Mishal has launched the program to improve the narrative building on Nutrition by engaging various stakeholders including press clubs, journalism associations, policy making institutes and academia across Pakistan.

This collaboration has come into two different phases i.e. Initially in the shape of support for AGAHI Awards, where the Australian Aid is supporting the Journalism Awards in the categories of Eliminating Hidden Hunger, Agriculture and the Food, Water and Energy Security Nexus.”

The second phase of the collaboration between the Australian Aid and Mishal is to build the capacity of journalists and field reporters to create a better understanding on nutrition related challenges, while at the same time it will capacitate the parliamentarians and policy makers to debate suggest and approve Nutrition focused policies for a productive workforce of the future. The initiative is working across Pakistan with focal areas in provincial and federal capitals in Sindh, Punjab, Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, AJK and the Federal Capital, Islamabad.

Through this initiative “Eliminating Hidden Hunger”, Mishal will build the capacity of more than 120 journalists and editors, while also engaging more than 60 parliamentarians and members of the federal and provincial standing committees on Food Security, Health and Agriculture etc. The initiative is supported by various development agencies and private sector organizations. The initiative is creating a master class of key opinion leaders in the country on nutrition and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) goal 2.

Mishal is also working with the National University of Modern Languages on research projects to create new vocabulary on Nutrition related issues in the leading languages being spoken in the country. Mishal through its flagship media development program, “AGAHI Awards”, has introduced multiple new categories on Nutrition, to encourage more public debate to be brought by media on this issue.

An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals. “Hidden hunger” is how health experts often refer to micronutrient deficiencies because most people affected do not show the visible physical symptoms and hence may not be aware of their condition. Hidden Hunger’s effects can be devastating, leading to mental impairment, poor health, low productivity, and even death. Its adverse effects on child health and survival are particularly acute, especially within the first 1,000 days of a child’s life, from conception to the age of two, resulting in serious physical and cognitive consequences.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Please visit Pakistan’s first infographic on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger” information and data at: http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/

Techlets Pakistan recognized as the Champion for Eliminating Hidden Hunger in Pakistan

21.1% population in Pakistan is undernourished, while 32% of children are malnourished. An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals.

Islamabad, PK 26 May 2017 – The flagship program to build policy consensus and advocacy initiative Eliminating Hidden Hunger has recognized Techlets Pakistan as the key knowledge partner for Pakistan. The initiative led by Mishal Pakistan, a country partner institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum recognized here today.

Techlets has been awarded the honour of being the “Champion to Eliminate Hidden Hunger” in recognition and support for creating the Nutrition-Specific Information Management System (MIS). The MIS not only provides a learning and knowledge platform for the legislators, policy makers and media but also updates the data in real time.

On the occasion, Ahsan Tahir, Chief Executive Officer of Techlets, said “this is a humble contribution from Techlets to serve and ensure a prosperous future of Pakistan. We are proud to be part of this initiative for being instrumental in conducting evidence backed data analysis & visualization (http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/) of the malnutrition landscape in Pakistan”. He further said, “this initiative is part of Techlets’s effort to raise awareness about complex subjects such as malnutrition. We hope this tool can serve the policy makers in knowledge-based decision making”.

Nida Karim, Program Specialist Eliminating Hidden Hunger at Mishal Pakistan said, “this effort from Techlets will not only help policy makers to understand the dynamics of malnutrition in Pakistan better, but would also allow accountability mechanisms for media and the citizens to ask right questions from public representative and service delivery organizations”.

The initiative by Mishal Pakistan has launched the program to improve the narrative building on Nutrition by engaging various stakeholders including press clubs, journalism associations, policy making institutes and academia across Pakistan.

Through this initiative “Eliminating Hidden Hunger”, Mishal will build the capacity of more than 120 journalists and editors, while also engaging more than 60 parliamentarians and members of the federal and provincial standing committees on food security, health and agriculture etc. The initiative is supported by various development agencies and private sector organizations. The initiative is creating a master class of key opinion leaders in the country on nutrition and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) goal 2.

An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals. “Hidden hunger” is how health experts often refer to micronutrient deficiencies because most people affected do not show the visible physical symptoms and hence may not be aware of their condition. Hidden Hunger’s effects can be devastating, leading to mental impairment, poor health, low productivity, and even death. Its adverse effects on child health and survival are particularly acute, especially within the first 1,000 days of a child’s life, from conception to the age of two, resulting in serious physical and cognitive consequences.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Please visit Pakistan’s first infographic on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger” information and data at: http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/

Mishal Launches Smart Fellowship Program on Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Malnutrition for Journalists in Sindh.

The program on Eliminating Hidden Hunger Hunger and Malnutrition to build media’s capacity to improve accountability mechanisms for Nutrition related development and public spending.

23 May 2017 – Karachi, PK – Mishal Pakistan, the Country Partner Institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum has launched a media development initiative to build the capacity of the journalists reporting on Nutrition in Sindh. The Fellowship program is focusing on enhancing media’s role to act as public watchdog on policy makers. The initiative, Eliminating Hidden Hunger is working with more than 1200 health journalists across SIndh to improve public perception, opinion and datasets on Nutrition and other related issues contributing to the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2.

Mishal is already working with the Sindh Assembly and its relevant standing committee on Health for “Smart Policy Making”. The cooperation has delivered a high level training initiative for the parliamentarians in Sindh, where the parliamentarians shared their views on the importance of media’s role to shape public policy according to people’s needs and requirements.

Dr. Sohrab Sarki, Chairman Standing Committee on Health of the Sindh Assembly said, “We see media as one of the most important players in the Smart Policy making framework, whereby media reflects the grass root realities of citizen’s needs, while making the policy makers accountable to the public for transparency and efficiency. Media is a crucial partner in knowledge creation and influencing the collective consciousness of the society. We need to bring media on board for Smart Policy making.

Amir Jahangir, Chief Executive Officer of Mishal Pakistan, said, “The current state of health in Pakistan is alarming. About 46.8 million people in Pakistan are malnourished. Through this initiative we are prioritizing development agendas by ensuring policy making through data and real time feedback through media. The program on Eliminating Hidden Hunger and Malnutrition will improve service delivery to the citizens and contribute further to improving Pakistan’s competitiveness on global footing, while improving accountability through media.”

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian High Commission (Australian Aid) reached out to Mishal, earlier this year, to partner and launch a nationwide program to create knowledge resources on Nutrition challenges in Pakistan. The program will address the “Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), Goal No. 2 ‘Zero Hunger’”.

Nida Karim, Program Specialist Eliminating Hidden Hunger at Mishal Pakistan, said, “The program focuses on increasing the capacity of media on Sustainable Development Goal no. 2 and enhance media’s role to be more proactive on public scrutiny of the policy makers on issues related to food security, improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture practices. Through this initiative Mishal is also launching a nutrition specific information management system for the journalists and policy makers.”

The initiative will build capacity of other stakeholders for the development and implementation of a multi-sectoral and integrated strategy for awareness raising, addressing general public, institutions, organizations, private sector, decision makers, and communities working on nutrition, health, hygiene and the nexus between malnutrition and other related issues.

Mishal Pakistan, the Country Partner Institute of the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Network of the World Economic Forum, is closely working with the Sindh Assembly’s Standing Committee on Primary and Secondary Health. The initiative by Mishal has launched the program to improve the narrative building on Nutrition by engaging various stakeholders including press clubs, journalism associations, policy making institutes and academia across Pakistan.

Mishal is also working with the National University of Modern Languages on research projects to create new vocabulary on Nutrition related issues in the leading languages being spoken in the country. Mishal through its flagship media development program, “AGAHI Awards”, has introduced multiple new categories on Nutrition, to encourage more public debate to be brought by media on this issue.

An estimated 2 billion people — over 30 percent of the world’s population suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals. “Hidden hunger” is how health experts often refer to micronutrient deficiencies because most people affected do not show the visible physical symptoms and hence may not be aware of their condition. Hidden Hunger’s effects can be devastating, leading to mental impairment, poor health, low productivity, and even death. Its adverse effects on child health and survival are particularly acute, especially within the first 1,000 days of a child’s life, from conception to the age of two, resulting in serious physical and cognitive consequences.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children and the more vulnerable – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. Zero Hunger is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Please visit Pakistan’s first infographic on “Eliminating Hidden Hunger” information and data at: http://eliminatinghiddenhunger.com/index.php/infographic/